Call for Submissions

Deadline extended!

The deadline for the the 13th Annual Concordia Graduate English Colloquium: The Odd Couple has been extended to Friday, January 23! For full details, see the original Call for Papers here. Please note that we are especially eager to see creative and hybrid proposals, as this year we will be integrating creative and hybrid presentations into the colloquium itself for the first time.

Proposals should be submitted to concordiacolloquium@gmail.com by Friday, January 23 and should not exceed 300 words. Presentations will be approximately 20 minutes in length. Creative and hybrid proposals should address how the piece or pieces engage with the theme. Please note that creative presentations need not consist of 20 minutes of reading original work; writers are encouraged to spend part of their presentation time discussing their piece(s) in relation to the theme, from critical or other perspectives. All applicants are encouraged to submit a brief bio of 40-50 words for use in promotional materials. Further questions can be directed to concordiacolloquium@gmail.com.

We look forward to reading your submissions!

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Call for Submissions

2015 Call for Submissions: The Odd Couple

The Odd Couple

Harmony From Conflict | Conflict From Harmony

February 27 | February 28 | March 1 2015

Peanut butter and cyanide. Hamlet and Homer Simpson. Creativity and critical analysis. What interplay is there between these seemingly disparate couples? Whether it’s Shostakovich sampled in Fall Out Boy, cronuts and pierogi poutine, strippercize classes in suburban gyms, or special editions of The Communist Manifesto on sale at Chapters, binary relationships, false or otherwise, are everywhere in our personal and professional lives. Trickier still, our familiar binaries need not be strictly codified opposites, for fluid ideas about genre, form, and social class often destabilize attempts to codify. For Canadians in particular, binary logic is old hat; how have we ever defined ourselves, save careful enumeration of what we are not?

The 13th Annual Concordia University English Graduate Colloquium is calling for academic, creative, and hybrid submissions about odd couplings. While we are all familiar with binaries, this colloquium aims to deconstruct commonly recognized pairings, create new ones, and explore the process through which a thing comes to be understood, not simply by its shape, but also its shadow. Ideal submissions will address odd, yet productive, couplings emphasizing the connections and disjunctions between ideas, texts, and authors. What is to be found in the spaces between? What symbiotic and synergistic relationships begin to unravel as we tug on pre-existing threads? What strange maps emerge as we sew together new ones?

Key Words:

· Dream & Reality

· Writing from the Margins; Margin & Centre; Margin & Interior

· Invasion & Exploration

· Synthesis & Mutation; Synergy & Aberration

· The Interplay of Science & Art

· The Human & The Machine; Human as Machine

· Binary (Code) as Language

· Oppositional Structures; Form & Content; Competing Media

· Anarchy & Art

· Growth & Decay

· Medieval & Modern

· Intersectionality; Axes of Identity; (In)equalities

· Harmony & Conflict

· Creative & Critical

Proposals should be submitted to concordiacolloquium@gmail.com by midnight on Friday, January 23rd and should not exceed 300 words. Presentations will be approximately 20 minutes in length. Creative and hybrid proposals should address how the piece or pieces engage with the theme. Please note that creative presentations need not consist of 20 minutes of reading original work; writers are encouraged to spend part of their presentation time discussing their piece(s) in relation to the theme, from critical or other perspectives. All applicants are encouraged to submit a brief bio of 40-50 words for use in promotional materials. Further questions can be directed to concordiacolloquium@gmail.com.

We look forward to reading your submissions!

2014, Call for Submissions

Call for Submissions

Gods & Idols: (Ex)Changes of the Sacred and Sanctified

During the humanist movement, there was a critical shift from theocentrism to egocentrism. In the 17th Century, Rene Descartes posited that rational argument could prove God’s existence. Human reason was no longer accountable to God; God now needed to stand in the court of human reason. Paving the way for the Enlightenment and the subsequent movements of modernity and postmodernity, this transition witnessed philosophers and poets intellectually abandon the divine. Revealing the relevance of this shift for literary studies, Barthes famously decried the death of the Author-God function. Milton’s muse has been replaced with a question mark.

In 2011, over 76% of Canadians reported an adherence to religious practices; however, this already broad statistic fails to take into account the fact that we all worship at the altar of pop culture. Despite Nietzsche’s proclamation, gods and idols are alive and well in the modern world. Our conference is interested in the areas of cultural, political, and intellectual exchange between the sacred (gods) and the sanctified (idols): the cultivation of the public images of pop stars, politicians, and (anti-) heroes throughout the ages. Do the subjects of media and the entertainment industry replace the sacred or do they function alongside or against it? Does the corporatization of idol figures and role models establish their cultural capital and significance? In other words, has media started to authorize what was previously religious territory? Where does public authority lie and what are its interstices?

Possible topics for consideration

–          Spirituality and faith; Secularism

–          Cult(ivation) of public/private image

–          (Socio-)Political hierarchy and validation

–          Mythology and folklore

–          Anthropocentrism

–          The trickster figure and the Picaro

–          Authority/Authorship

–          The (anti-) hero’s quest

–          The comic book and/or the graphic novel; the comix movement

–          Issues and theorizations of (self-)representation

–          Arts, artefacts and canonicity

–          Translation and orality

–          Blog culture and its narcissism/activism (ie: wikileaks)

–          Activism, pacifism and violence

–          Ideology, morality, ethics, justice, forgiveness and vengeance

–          Exegesis and hermeneutics

–          Amanuensis and anonymity

–          Simulacra, constructions and emulations

12th Annual English Graduate Colloquium is on March 1, 2014 at Concordia University, Montreal, QC

Please send your 200-word abstract and a brief bio to concordiacolloquium@outlook.com. We have extended the deadline to January 17, 2014 at noon. If you have a paper that you would like to submit but that doesn’t seem to fit the topics we’ve listed, submit it anyway. (It’s hard to predict how the sessions will compose themselves so it might very well find a home in one of our panels.) We look forward to reading your submissions!